Highlever House is a full refurbishment and extension of a Victorian house in London realized by Haptic Architects. The design emerging from the London and Oslo architectural studio is focused on the user experience, both visually and tactile. They juxtaposed perfectly the old and the new in a spacious and luminous extension where generous floor-to-ceiling windows allow plenty of light to flood the rooms. The white kitchen and the dining area has two massive skylights that enhanced the minimalist design imagined by the architects. Concrete floors and countertop, white surfaces, clean lines and nicely chosen bar stools are very attractive to me.

The connection between the interior and the garden is extremely effective; this green space becomes an extra room to the house and leads to a second studio at the back end of the courtyard. The sleek interior design of Haptic (take a look at that post) is impeccable and their attention to details is expressed through the exterior treatment as well. The vertical timber cladding gives the volume a nice simplicity, and the narrow slats of untreated larch that will naturally turn grey over time bring a subtle touch of texture on the surface of the contemporary addition.

“The original Victorian staircase was left intact with the patina on show,” said Haedrich, the architect. “We enjoy the contrast of this with the rest of the house, with crisp and refined detailing.”

The seamless aesthetic developed by Haptic contrasts with the Victorian house, but with a careful use of materials and a limited palette of colours, the new features are superbly integrated to the original architecture.

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Photos: Simon Kennedy via Dezeen